What are Connecticut’s texting and driving laws?

Wednesday September 3, 2014

Driving any kind of vehicle is an act of responsibility, as all New Haven, Connecticut, residents are probably aware. The requirement that drivers carry licenses also stipulates that they follow the state’s driving rules, regulations and laws. Among these laws is a ban on texting while driving. Drivers caught texting will likely to receive a traffic citation for the act – in addition to the harm it may cause to other drivers and pedestrians on the road.

This strict rule is necessitated by the fact that drivers are likely to be distracted when doing so, and thus pose a risk not only to themselves but also others on the road. The severity of the law does change for certain drivers. For instance, operators of buses are prohibited from using cell phones altogether while driving buses. Besides being a large vehicle capable of significant damage in a collision, it is easy to see why bus drivers are held to higher standard, given that a bus can carry a greater number of passengers than normal cars.

A similar comprehensive ban also applies to drivers using a learner’s permit, or drivers under the age of 18, who are classified novice drivers. Statistics show that this age bracket is most susceptible to car accidents caused by distracted drivers. In Connecticut, the violation constitutes a primary offense, for which the driver may be required to pay a fine.

Underlying these laws is research into the amount of time different kinds of drivers have their attention diverted by a phone call or text message. Even though this moment might seem to be a fraction, it is a sufficient enough time to result in a serious car accident causing injuries, or even death.

Those who have been injured in an accident caused by someone who was texting and driving, or a driver who was distracted in any other way, may be able to obtain compensation by filing a personal injury claim. No one should have to suffer financially from someone else’s negligence.

Source: Distraction.gov, “Frequently Asked Questions,” accessed in Aug. 28, 2014

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