New study gives Connecticut’s nursing homes a poor score

Saturday January 14, 2017

Many times, across the country, family members are unable to care for their loved ones as their medical needs increase with age. In such situations, finding a suitable nursing home to watch over our aging parents and grandparents is sometimes the best option. When we rely on others to provide care for those we love, we trust that they will treat our family members appropriately to ensure their safety. Unfortunately, that is not always the case.

According to a recent study, conducted by Families for Better Care, nursing homes in many states – including Connecticut – do not meet the standards we expect from long-term care facilities.

The researchers examined nursing home data in a variety of areas to determine the best and worst states across the U.S. They considered staffing levels in the nursing homes, complaints received, cited deficiencies and inspection reports to reach their conclusions. While some states performed well, many received failing grades in at least some of those areas.

During the next 10 years, the number of residents in nursing homes will likely increase by approximately 40 percent, as the Baby Boomer population continues to age. Consequently, resolving these known problems in America’s nursing homes is critical in the coming years.

Study points to specific problems with Connecticut’s nursing homes

The nursing homes in Connecticut ranked poorly in a number of areas. Although the long-term care facilities received an overall passing score for the percentage with deficiencies, the nursing homes received a failing grade for the percentage with severe deficiencies. In total, over 41 percent of the nursing homes in Connecticut have been cited for severe deficiencies, ranking the state 49th in the country in this category.

In addition, Connecticut’s nursing homes received a failing score for the percentage with above average health inspections. In total, only slightly over 30 percent of the nursing homes received above average inspection reports.

Connecticut fared better when it came to staffing levels. Nursing home residents in Connecticut receive an average of 2.43 hours of direct care and 0.83 hours of care from an RN each day. While this may not seem like a significant amount of time, these statistics place Connecticut’s long-term care facilities in the middle of the pack across the country.

If you have a loved one in a nursing home in Connecticut, be cognizant of the potential problems that could arise during the course of his or her care. If you believe your loved one has not been treated appropriately, seek the advice of a skilled personal injury attorney to ensure his or her rights are protected.

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